Biden Begins Withdrawing Troops from Afghanistan

A U.S. soldier runs near a special forces unit of the Afghan National Army during a morning training session last year on a base near Kabul.

Lorenzo Tugnoli, Washington Post

A U.S. soldier runs near a special forces unit of the Afghan National Army during a morning training session last year on a base near Kabul.

In a historic and potentially folly move, President Joe Biden has promised to withdraw all US troops from Afghanistan by Sept. 11th, 2021. However, new information from al-Qaeda shows that this choice may be the wrong one.

The US has had troops in Afghanistan for 20 years now, its longest war to date, and this decision signals a hopeful end to the conflict. The war began with the Sept. 11 attacks on the Twin Towers in 2001, an assault the US quickly countered with their mobilization into Afghanistan.

Since then, approximately 2,500 US troops have been stationed in the country. More than 100,000 Afghan civilians have been killed.

After engaging in talks with the Afghanistan Taliban, the Biden Administration has made a deal. In exchange for the Taliban breaking ties with terrorist group al-Qaeda, the perpetrators of the 9/11 attacks, the US will remove their troops from Afghanistan.

Antony Blinken, the US Secretary of State, summed up their reasoning: “We went to Afghanistan 20 years ago, and we went because we were attacked on 9/11, and we went to take on those who had attacked us on 9/11, and to make sure that Afghanistan would not again become a haven for terrorism directed at the United States or any of our allies and partners. And we achieved the objectives that we set out to achieve.”

However, new information is surfacing. In an exclusive and rare interview with al-Qaeda representatives, CNN stringer Saleem Mehsud was told that “war against the US will be continuing on all other fronts unless they are expelled from the rest of the Islamic world.”

The usually reclusive terrorist organization’s choice to comment now is a sign already, and with the addition of this comment and further suggestions that the Taliban may be deceiving the Biden Administration, Biden’s decision is being called into question.

Still, President Biden maintains his decision, saying in a joint session in Congress that “we will maintain an over-the-horizon capability to suppress future threats to the homeland.”